B-2

 

Type B-2 winter flying cap

 

Flying caps were designed for aircrew aboard aircraft with enclosed cockpits, using headsets for communication. While the summer version Type B-1 was made of OD gabardine cloth, the Type B-2 winter flying cap was constructed of sheep shearling. Featuring folding ear flaps and a stiff leather sun visors, it provided some warmth in colder environments.

Standardized in April 1939 it became very popular among air and ground crew alike, despite airmen being officially encouraged by 1942 to wear flying helmets, masks and goggles  for increased protection against severe cold and flash burns.

These caps seem to have been also worn in civilian life after WWII, as specimen in larger sizes in particular are now rather hard to find.

Sunglasses, flying, Type II

 

AN6531-4 Type II "Comfort Cable" sunglasses

Manufacturer: American Optical Co.

Order No.: 45-5037AF

Specification No.: AN-G-22

 

The Type II flying sunglasses are very similar to the Type I but provided better protection with their „rose smoke“ greater density lenses (examples with green lenses also exist). Furthermore, the nose bridge has a definite oval shape, which distinguishes the Type II from its predecessor, which had a more rectangular nose bridge. This model saw widespread use among all flying personnel towards the end of WWII.

HS-33 headset

 

T-30 throat microphone

 

A throat microphone works with the vibrations of the larynx (Adam's apple) and needs to be held tightly against the wearer's throat in order to ensure clear voice transmission.

The T-30 was the standard throat microphone of the US Army Air Forces during WWII. It is a carbon microphone, made of black rubber and is anchored around the wearer's neck by an adjustable elastic strap. The latter was fixed to the throat microphone by means of leather loops attached with snap fasteners. 

It was produced in over twenty variations by different manufacturers, those being indicated by a suffix code letter to the type designation, e.g. T-30-S for the Universal Microphone Co. or the T-30-V by Shure Bros.